Connect
To Top

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex

Sharing is caring!

 10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex

Latest technology, like advanced radar technology, and profound scientific research reveal new fascinating facts about the Stonehenge complex. What we used to understand as a single archaeological site, comprised of couple of monoliths has been transformed into an enormous ancient complex, covering several square miles. Finding the new Stonehenge ruins has just pushed us into a new era of research on this ancient complex. The list below is a sum up of what British scientists have so far found.

10) Stonehenge is not the primary monument

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Wikimedia

The Stonehenge Concealed Landscape Project is a project conducted by a group of British archaeologists who are mapping the Stonehenge region. In 2015, they declared the discovery of a whole complex comprising multiple monuments, all situated within a couple miles of the world renowned Stonehenge site. One of these constructions was a tremendous building made from timbers that’s believed to have been used to prepare the deceased for burial, including defleshing operations.

Using new imaging techniques, the scientists have found ancient pits, some of which are aligned to the course of the Sun. The job so far has added much info on Iron Age, Bronze Age, and Roman settlements that were in the region, making it one of the largest Bronze Age archaeological sites in the world.

9) The Amesbury Archer

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Pasicles

In a newly discovered grave was found a golden earring that might be the earliest-known gold handcrafted item, excavated in Britain. Exceptionally uncommon, these gold items typically appeared in pairs.

The grave is among the richest early Bronze Age burials found in Britain. The occupant is referred to as the Amesbury Archer and may perhaps even have been the king of Stonehenge. A black wrist band used for tools and archery were found together with an exquisite copper knife, as well in this grave. Aside that, a  tusk of a boar, a Beaker pot, a kind of Bronze Age boat, and a group of flints.

8) The Aubrey Holes

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Wikimedia

The Aubrey Holes are 56 pits found at Stonehenge in 1920, named after the 17th century antiquarian John Aubrey. Thirty two of these were excavated between 1920 and 1924, with two more in 1950.

Mainly ancient debris was comprised by the Aubrey holes with veins of bone and cremated ashes. Some 60 individual discoveries of cremated remains are excavated and recorded at Stonehenge, representing some 50 people. Most of these skeletal remains were excavated from Aubrey Hole Number Seven, but it’s been indicated, that as many as 240 people may have been interned at Stonehenge, which would make it by far the biggest Early Bronze Age cemetery in the British Isles.

7) Science Trivia – Stonehenge

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Edwin Newman

The first scientist to associate astronomy with Stonehenge was Reverend Edward Duke, who described the monument as “a planetarium full of important astronomical conjunctions.” Most of his thoughts were not really scientific and somewhat mysterious.

Recognizing that on the summer solstice in the third and second millennium BC, the Sun rose just at the point of the principal axis, Sir Norman Lockyer became the first to identify the motive for the orientation of Stonehenge. Gerald Hawkins in his novel Stonehenge Decoded, describes how he discovered 165 quantifiable points, that astronomically align with the Moon and Sun, and not with any stars or inner planets visible to the naked eye (including Saturn, Jupiter, Mar, Venus, and Mercury). He additionally found that lunar eclipses could be correctly forecast via a system of moving rocks around the Aubrey Holes.

6) Transferring The Monoliths

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Mavratti/Wikimedia

Officially declaring his decisions about how the ancients transferred the Stonehenge monoliths to the Society of Antiquaries in London in 1921, geologist Herbert Thomas offered a theory including intrepid Neolithic voyagers. These voyagers first quarried and then carried off multi-ton blue stones from the tops of tall jagged crags in western Wales to Stonehenge, nearly 400 kilometers (250 mi) across the ancient terrain.

There have been multiple attempts at reproducing the transfer of megalithic rocks, that were similar, but considerably smaller by using them to transfer along. These systems have proved to be difficult at best, even when transferring smaller rocks.

5) Theories On The Purpose Of Stonehenge

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Wikimedia

Ancient civilizations, without the usage of steel or wheel, created a masterpiece of monolithic building, and that was tens of centuries ago. They did it in what’s now modern day Wiltshire England. These early folks erected multi-ton sandstone monoliths, in a complicated ring-shaped design, that’s baffled scientists since the day it was located.

Middleage legend has it that the magic magician Merlin conjured up the site in the 12th century. Modern gossips are that UFOs see the site on a regular basis. Nevertheless, there are several possible theories that are based on solid science. They range from a burial site, to a spot of healing, to a sound stage, and an astronomic observatory and celestial calendar, or maybe even an instance of a culture-wide morale building exercise.

4) Who Built Stonehenge?

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Wikimedia

One theory says Stonehenge was constructed for ritualistic purposes by the high priests of the Celts — the Druids. John Aubrey, was one of the first to theorize that the Druids were the contractors. A century afterwards, it was also Dotor William Stukley, who was also convinced that the Druids were responsible for Stonehenge. Then, he became a Druid himself as well.

This theory has been disregarded by later research. Carbon measures pointed out that the monuments predate the coming of the Druids on the British landscape by over 1,000 years. In such case, it is impossible to consider that they built the Stonehenge. It is more likely that they have discovered it as a historical ruin, just like we did.

3) Woodhenge

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Wikimedia

A Neolithic site built around 2300 BC, Woodhenge, was at first thought to be a huge burial mound. It’s entirely surrounded by a ditch and a bank that was nearly ruined by field work. Aerial photography pointed out dark spots in the fields of wheat. Then, scientists, through further excavation proved that these areas used to be timbers, which were set upright into pits, and ordered in several rings. The outer ring of timbers were considerably deeper than the interior ones – this indicated they were used to support roofing lumbers.

Further research also showed that the site was open to the atmosphere, letting light into the building. A grave was excavated in the center of it, including the body of a three year old kid, who is believed to have been a sacrifice victim, since its head had been split open by an ax. Woodhenge is just 70 meters away from Durrington Walls, and less than 3 kilometers from Stonehenge. In fact, it could really count as part of the new Stonehenge complex.

2) Cursus

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Psychostevouk/Wikimedia

A big ditch believed to have been constructed between 3100 and 2800 BC, the Great Cursus sits less than 300 meters (1,000 feet) from Stonehenge. This tremendous artifact runs in an east to west alignment, dug into the chalk that is tough.

The function of this colossal structure is not known. Some believe it may have been some sort of racetrack, but others believe it was some sort of precession manner maybe used for honoring the dead.

1) Superhenge

10 Fascinating Facts About The New Stonehenge Complex - Outchemy
Photo credit: Juan Torrejon Valdelomar

The Stonehenge Concealed Landscape Project also made a discovery of some of the biggest Neolithic ritual monuments detected in the British Isles – an enormous semi circle from rocks that were huge, believed to be 4,500 years old, and located at Durrington Walls. Some of the giant monoliths quantify up to 5 meters (15 feet) in length and are located entirely deep in the ground. Researchers said that this site is quite exceptional and of  “an incredible scale.”

All of these discoveries really throw a new light on the Stonehenge complex. We see an utterly enlarged, new Stonehenge complex, and our curiosity could be only further triggered.

More in Europe

  • Road Trip Across Eastern Europe

    Sharing is caring!FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestWhen people think of European vacations, most picture sipping espresso outside Parisian cafes, rolling out spaghetti in Italian restaurants,...

    assistantNov 15, 2017
  • Road Trip Across Eastern Europe

    Sharing is caring!FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest When people think of European vacations, most picture sipping espresso outside Parisian cafes, rolling out spaghetti in Italian...

    assistantNov 15, 2017
  • 8 things which give you inspiration in Milan

    Sharing is caring!FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestOne day I realized that I needed a motivation and enthusiasm to have  better and more productive life,  which...

    assistantSep 26, 2017